Unmasking a Legend: The Story of Angus Deaton

OV Digital Desk
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Angus Deaton

Angus Deaton is a British economist and academic. Angus Deaton was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel in 2015.

Life and Career

Angus Deaton was born on 19 October 1945 (age 77 years), in Edinburgh, United Kingdom.

He attended Fettes College in Edinburgh. Deaton earned his bachelor’s degree in economics from the University of Cambridge in 1967. He continued his studies at the University of Cambridge, completing a Ph.D. in 1975.

Deaton had a distinguished academic career, with teaching and research positions at the University of Bristol, the University of Cambridge, and Princeton University. He has made significant contributions to the field of economics, particularly in the areas of consumption, savings, poverty, and inequality.

Deaton’s work on measuring and understanding individual and household well-being and consumption patterns has been influential in shaping economic policy. Deaton is widely known for his development of the Almost Ideal Demand System (AIDS), a model used to estimate consumer demand and analyze consumer behavior. He has conducted extensive research on poverty, health, and well-being, shedding light on issues like income inequality, health disparities, and global development.

Award and Legacy

Angus Deaton was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel in 2015. He received this prestigious honor for his extensive and influential contributions to the field of economics, particularly in the areas of consumption, poverty, and welfare.

Deaton’s work has significantly shaped the field of economics, particularly in the study of consumer behavior and well-being. His development of the Almost Ideal Demand System (AIDS) has had a lasting impact on the analysis of consumer demand and the understanding of market dynamics.

Angus Deaton’s legacy extends far beyond his Nobel Prize. His contributions to economics, particularly in the areas of consumption, poverty, and well-being, continue to influence research, policy, and our understanding of economic and societal challenges. His work has had a lasting impact on the fields of economics, public health, and global development.

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